I Castle Am Captured

Hi, I like stuff!

elosilla:

Yoshitaka Amano, japanese graphic artist and character designer, usually made his illustrations with ink and watercolor. Well known for designing characters for video games such as Final Fantasy, or his artwork in Sandman or Vampire Hunter D. 

(via cleolinda)

oorequiemoo:

Mermaid with waterlilies

french postcard, ca 1900

Only thin, weak thinkers despise fairy stories. Each one has a true, strange fact hidden in it, you know, which you can find if you look.
Diana Wynne Jones, ‘Fire and Hemlock’ (via dephinia)

(via burdge)

comeswithasword:

oh my god just last week my sister and I were talking about the importance of a character’s hair in different scenes and I was thinking of abigail, what with her wavy hair pre-slit-throat, braid in the hospital as a transition of sorts, and her completely straight hair from then on out. and then I was trying to decipher the importance of the ponytail from the finale and

the only other time she has a ponytail is in the flashback when she’s hunting with her dad.

and being forced to kill.

pyrrhiccomedy:

pikestaff:

This town in Russia is called Zheleznogorsk.

Their flag and coat of arms is a bear splitting the atom.

image

That is all.

*kicks down door, knocks over end table, vase crashes to the floor*

No that is NOT all, because Zheleznogorsk is really interesting.

It was a secret city, established in 1950 in the middle of Nowhere, Siberia for the purpose of researching nuclear weaponry and producing massive quantities of plutonium, the facilities for which were hidden inside a hollowed-out mountain. It appeared on no maps and no census data. Although more than 100,000 people lived there at one point, satellite imagery would have shown only a fairly small mining town. The mountain complex contained 3,500 rooms and three plutonium reactors, which were kept cool by one of the mightiest river in Siberia. The space had been excavated by tens of thousands of gulag slave laborers, who removed more rock from inside the mountain than was used to build the Great Pyramids. Protected under the granite peak of the mountain, these facilities would survive a direct nuclear attack.

No one called it “Zheleznogorsk.” Officially, it was “Krasnoyarsk-26,” which is something like naming a city ‘Arizona-17.’ Residents traveling outside the city called it Iron Town, if they had to refer to it at all. They were under strict instructions never to reveal to anyone the actual business of Krasnoyarsk-26. 

And life there was fantastic. People living and working in the secret city received some of the best wages in the Soviet Union. There were sports stadiums, public gardens, a movie theater, and the shortages notorious in the rest of the USSR were unknown. The best nuclear scientists in Russia lived in a sealed-off utopia. 

A third of all the nuclear weapons produced in Russia during the Cold War were powered by fuel from Zheleznogorsk. At the time, the image of the great Russian bear ripping apart an atom with brute strength wouldn’t have seemed very funny at all.

(via balphesian)